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Surfing the 100ft swell at Nazare, 60 Minutes Australia

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Nazaré is a popular surfing destination because of its very high breaking waves that form due to the presence of the underwater Nazaré Canyon.[8] As the canyon creates constructive interference between the incoming swell waves, it makes their heights much larger on this stretch of coast. On November 8, 2017, German big wave specialist Sebastian Steudtner surfed an 80 ft wave, however this has been disputed since. In January 2018 Portuguese surfer Hugo Vau surfed a potentially 35 m (115 ft) high wave, known as “the big mama”, on 19 January 2018; an achievement yet to be authenticated by the Guinness Book of Records.

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Our World

The amazing Faroe Islands

In a world of amazing places, the Faroe Islands have to rank up there with the most amazing ….

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Tindhólmur Faroe Islands

10 Years ago I stumbled across photos of very interesting looking islands. On further investigation I found that these were the Faroe Islands and that they lie north, north west of the UK approximately 300km from the top end of Scotland and between the North Atlantic Ocean and the Norwegian Sea. We posted about the Faroe Islands back then and the story was very popular, So popular that we have decided to reprise the post with some new and larger images and hope that a new audience may like these images and the story. All of the photos are by Olavur Frederiksen and we are extremely thankful for Olavur’s permission to use these photos. I highly recommend that you visit his website links at the end of this story to see more of his work. TO SEE MANY MORE PHOTOS HERE, SCROLL THIS POST..

Klaksvik, second largest town in the Faroes and located on island of Bordoy

Klaksvik Faroe Islands
Photo: Olavur Frederiksen @ https://www.facebook.com/faroephoto/

Gáshólmur and Tindhólmur

Gáshólmur and Tindhólmur
Photo: Olavur Frederiksen @ https://www.facebook.com/faroephoto/

More Information on the Faroe Islands

History of The Faroe Islands

Not much is known of the earliest history of the islands, Irish hermits (monks) settled on the islands in the sixth century, bringing with them sheep and oats as well as early Irish language.

Around 650 AD the Vikings replaced the Irish, bringing with them the Old Norse language, which has evolved into the currently spoken (Faroese) language which is spoken today. These viking settlers came from Norwegian settlements in Shetland, Orkney and islands in the Irish Sea.

Norwegian control of the Islands continued until 1380, when Norway entered into the Kalmar Union with Denmark and control gradually transferred to Denmark. When this union between Norway and Denmark was dissolved as a result of the Kiel Treaty in 1814, Denmark retained control of the Faroe Islands.

During World War 2 the British army occupied the islands so as to strengthen control of the North Atlantic, however after the war control reverted back to Denmark and a home-rule regime was implemented granting a high degree of local autonomy.

So where in the world are The Faroe Islands

Faroe Isalnds Map
Image: Google Earth

18 main islands make up the Faroes

Faroe Isalnds Map
Image: Wikipedia

Economy

“The Faroes declined to join Denmark in entering the European Community (now European Union) in 1973. The islands experienced considerable economic difficulties following the collapse of the fishing industry in the early 1990s, but have since made efforts to diversify the economy. Support for independence has grown and is the objective of the government.”

The Faroe Islands’ Unemployment levels have come back in the last few years, with unemployment down to 5% in mid-1998. By June 2008 unemployment had declined to 1.1%, before rising to 3.2% in December 2014, although this is still among the lowest in Europe. Nevertheless, the almost total dependence on fishing means that the economy remains extremely vulnerable. The current fishing catch landed in the Faroe Islands are either exported fresh or processed into fresh fillets, frozen fillets or wet salted fish. Other species are processed into fish meal and oil, or feed for the fish farms. The primary export markets are Denmark (shrimp), Great Britain (Cod and haddock), Germany, France (coly, redfish, black halibut), the Mediterranean countries (salted fish), USA (frozen cod and haddock) and Japan (shrimps, trout).

Petroleum reserves

In 2014 the United Nations Commission recognized the claimed entitlement of the Faroe Islands to local oil reserves, which means that the Faroes will be allocated at least 27,000 km² of the shelf north of the Faroe Islands, of which the Faroes will have the sovereign right to exploration of resources both on the seabed and the underground.
Source: faroeislands.fo

Information Technology

Since 2000, new information technology and business projects have also been fostered in the Faroe Islands to attract new investment.

Faroe Islands Winter Sheep
Photo: Olavur Frederiksen @ https://www.facebook.com/faroephoto/

Faroe-Islands-Winter
Photo: Olavur Frederiksen @ https://www.facebook.com/faroephoto/

Climate

As discussed above the Faroe Islands are approx 350 km north north west of the top end of Scotland, making them not far from the southern end of the Arctic Circle. Considering their high latitude the islands are not as cold as you might expect, with average temperatures of 3 degrees Celsius in winter and 11 degrees Celsius in summer. That said the Islands are covered in much snow during the colder months, as can be seen in the above photos, This snow then forms a melt and plenty of water for the growth of the plentiful green grass all over the islands, which can be seen in many of the other photos.

Litla-Dimun, the only uninhabited island of the Faroe Islands

Lítla Dímun Faroe Isalnds
Photo: Olavur Frederiksen @ https://www.facebook.com/faroephoto/

Geography

The Faroe Islands consist of eighteen separate islands. The whole area of the Islands is approximately 1399 square km (540 sq Mles). There is 1117 kilometes (694 mi) of coastline. There are no land boundaries with any other country. The only island that is uninhabited is Lítla Dímun.

“The Islands are rugged and are dominated by tholeiitic basalt lava which was part of the great Thulean Plateau during the Paleogene period.”

Gásadalur, located on the west-side of Vágar Island

Gásadalur, Vágar Island

Photo: Olavur Frederiksen @ https://www.facebook.com/faroephoto/

Mykines Lighthouse

Mykines Lighthouse
Photo: Olavur Frederiksen @ https://www.facebook.com/faroephoto/

Transportation

“Vágar Airport has scheduled service to destinations from Vágoy Island. The largest Faroese airline is Atlantic Airways.Due to the rocky terrain and relatively small size of the Faroe Islands, its transportation system was not as extensive as other places of the world. This situation has changed, and today the infrastructure has been developed extensively. Some 80% of the population in the islands is connected by under-ocean tunnels, bridges, and causeways which bind the three largest islands and three other large islands to the northeast together.”

Tórshavn Capital City of The Faroe Islands
Photo: Olavur Frederiksen @ https://www.facebook.com/faroephoto/

Torshavn Harbour

Torshavn Harbour Faroe Islands
Photo: Olavur Frederiksen @ https://www.facebook.com/faroephoto/

Aurora over Tórshavn

Aurora over Tórshavn Faroe Islands
Photo: Olavur Frederiksen @ https://www.facebook.com/faroephoto/

Tórshavn and Harbour

Torshavn Harbour-Faroe Islands
Photo: Olavur Frederiksen @ https://www.facebook.com/faroephoto/

Traditional grass covered roofs

Grass covered roof in the Faroe Islands
Photo: Olavur Frederiksen @ https://www.facebook.com/faroephoto/

Pilot Whales

Faroe Islands Pilot Whales
Photo: Olavur Frederiksen @ https://www.facebook.com/faroephoto/

Klaksvík, second largest town in Faroe and on the Island of Bordoy

Klaksvík Faroe Islands
Photo: Olavur Frederiksen @ https://www.facebook.com/faroephoto/

Tindhólmur

Tindhólmur Faroe Islands
Photo: Olavur Frederiksen @ https://www.facebook.com/faroephoto/

Tindhólmur

Tindhólmur Faroe Islands
Photo: Olavur Frederiksen @ https://www.facebook.com/faroephoto/

One final thing, I have made myself a promise that I will travel to the Faroe Islands sometime in the future, It’s such and incredible looking place and I am really looking forward to some helicopter rides around the islands.

Credits

I must thank Olavur Frederiksen of Faroe Photo for allowing me to use some of his amazing collection of photos. Please see his website link below if you are interested, he has many more wonderful photos. The Faroe Photo Site has a shop which allows you to purchase 150 Impressions of the Faroes Islands.

Olavur Frederiksen @ Faroe Photo

All other information for this post was obtained via Wikipedia.

Faroe Islands on Wikipedia

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Our World

Secluded house on a far away island

Is this house the most isolated in the world?

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Elliðaey Island

Some refer to this place as the most isolated house in the World and given it’s location off the coast of Iceland, I guess they’d be not far wrong, The Island is called Elliðaey, or Ellirey if you don’t have the Icelandic lingo down pat.

So just where is Elliðaey Island ?

Elliðaey Island map
Map showing Elliðaey Island’s location off the South West Coast of Iceland

A bit of the History Elliðaey Island

Three hundred years ago, Elliðaey was inhabited by five families. They lived there in huts and survived by fishing and raising cattle on the island’s grassy pasture — and by hunting puffins. By the 1930’s though, the last of these inhabitants left the island, and it remained largely uninhabited until 1953, when the Elliðaey Hunting Association built a lodge for it’s members to use whilst they were visiting for hunting Puffins on the island.

Below are some more stunning photos of Elliðaey Island.

Elliðaey Island

Elliðaey Island

Elliðaey Island
Image: Diego Delso, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=37347785

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Our World

Kjerag Norway, base jumping and more

More than just Base Jumping, Kjerag Norway is an incredible part of the world with 360 degrees of outstanding visuals, Getalookat some of the amazing view

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Kjerag Base Jump

Video: Spectacular Norway via YouTube

Kjerag Norway, is a mountain in Forsand municipality in the county of Rogaland. The 1084 metre high mountain is situated on the southern shore of the Lysefjorden and just southwest of the village of Lysebotn. The northern side of Kjerag mountain has a cliff plunging 984 metres (3,228ft) down to Lysefjorden.

Kjerag is a popular destination in Norway and is a renowned site for Basejumping, however there are many visitors who come to see the spectacular views to or from the fjord below and also to hike to the top of the mountain.

Kjerag Fjord
Kjerag and Lysefjord, Image Credit:Pixabay

Apart from the amazing 360 degree views, visitors also come to have their photo taken on the Kjeragbolten, this is a large stone wedged between 2 adjacent cliff sides and suspended 984 metres high.

Kjerag Standing
Kjeragbolten, Image Credit:Pixabay

Kjeragbolten Norway
Kjeragbolten, Image Credit:www.thewholeworldisaplayground.com

There is also a Waterfall called Kjeragfossen adding another dimension to the visual appeal of Kjerag and it’s surrounding location.

Kjeragfossen Norway
Kjeragbolten, Image Credit:Reddit

So where exactly is Kjerag

Kjerag Norway

An aerial view from Google Maps Satellite of Kjerag showing the mountainous rocky terrain

Kjerag

Kjerag Norway, another of those amazing places in Our World.

If you are interested in travelling to Kjerag, VisitNorway.com is a great website, see the link below for more information visitnorway.com

If you liked this post, Get A Look At our home page and other posts and stay tuned, we have regular updates and are constantly searching our world for interesting stories.

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