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Bruce Springsteen inducts The E Street Band into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

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Friday April 11th The E Street Band was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame by their Frontman Bruce Springsteen. Bruce has always acknowledged the role the E Street Band has had on his career and this night was no exception with this except from his speech;

I told a story with the E Street Band that was, and is, bigger than I ever could have told on my own. And I believe that settles that question.

So with his usual Poetry in Motion Bruce goes on to tell the story of the E street band in a way that only he could. For all you fans of The Boss sit back and listen as he takes you on a lyrical journey that makes you feel somewhat like you were there.

Bruce Springsteen

Good evening. In the beginning, there was Mad Dog Vini Lopez, standing in front of me, fresh out of jail, his head shaved, in the Mermaid Room of the Upstage Club in Asbury Park. He told me he had a money-making outfit called Speed Limit 25, they were looking for a guitarist and was I interested? I was broke, so I was. So the genesis point of the E Street Band was actually a group that Vini Lopez asked me to join to make a few extra dollars on the weekend.

Shortly thereafter, I met Dan Federici. He was draped in three quarter-length leather, had his red hair slicked back with his wife Flo — she was decked out in the blonde, bouffant wig — and they were straight out of Flemington, NJ.

So Vini, Danny, myself, along with bass player Vinnie Roslin, were shortly woodshedding out of a cottage on the main street of a lobster-fishing town: Highlands, NJ. We first saw Garry Tallent along with Southside Johnny when they dragged two chairs onto an empty dance floor as I plugged my guitar into the upstage wall of sound. I was the new kid in a new town, and these were the guys who owned the place. They sat back and looked at me like, “Come on, come on, punk. Bring it. Let’s see what you got.” And I reached back and I burnt their house down.

Click to see more of the speech and Songs from the night –>

Garry Tallent’s great bass-playing and Southern gentleman’s presence has anchored my band for 40 years. Thank you, Garry! Thank you, sir.

Then one night, I wandered in the Upstage, and I was dumbstruck by a baby-faced, 16-year-old David Sancious. Davey was very, very unusual: He was a young, black man who — in 1968, Asbury Park, which was not a peaceful place — crossed the tracks in search of musical adventure, and he blessed us with his talent and his love. He was my roomie in the early, two-guys-to-one-six-dollar-motel-room years of the E Street Band. He was good, he kept his socks clean; it was lovely. And he was carrying around a snake around his neck at that time, so I lucked out with Davey as my roommate. [laughs] AND, Davey’s the only member of the group who ever actually lived on E Street!

So I walked in and he was on the club’s organ. And Davey’s reserved now, but at the time, he danced like Sly Stone and he played like Booker T, and he poured out blues and soul and jazz and gospel and rock & roll and he had things in his keyboard that we just never heard before. It was just so full of soul and so beautiful. Davey, we love you, and we still miss you so, you know?

But predating all of this was Steve Van Zandt. Steven: frontman, hitman. I walk into the Middletown Hullabaloo Club; he was the frontman for a band called the Shadows. He had on a tie that went from here down to his feet. All I remember is that he was singing the Turtles’ “Happy Together.” During a break at the Hullabaloo Club in New Jersey, he played 55 minutes on and five minutes off, and if there was a fight, he had to rush onstage and start playing again.

So I met Stevie there and he soon became my bass player first, then lead guitarist. My consigliere, my dependable devil’s advocate whenever I need one. The invaluable ears for everything that I create, I always get ahold of him, and fan number one. So he’s my comic foil onstage, my fellow producer/arranger and my blood, blood, blood, blood, blood brother. Let’s keep rolling for as many lives as they’ll give us, alright?

Years and bands went by: Child, Steel Mill, the Bruce Springsteen Band — they were all some combo of the above-mentioned gang. Then I scored a solo recording contract with Columbia Records, and I argued to get to choose my recording “sidemen,” which was a misnomer, in this case, if there ever was one.

So, I chose my band and my great friends, and we finally landed on E Street — the rare, rock & roll hybrid of solo artistry and a true rock & roll band.

But one big thing was missing … It was a dark and stormy night, a Nor’easter rattled the street lamps on Kingsley Blvd. and in walked Clarence Clemons. I’d been enthralled by the sax sounds of King Curtis and I searched for years for a great rock & roll saxophonist. And that night Clarence walked in, walked towards the stage and he rose, towering to my right on the Prince’s tiny stage, about the size of this podium, and then he unleashed the force of nature that was the sound and the soul of the Big Man. In that moment, I knew that my life had changed. Miss you, love you Big Man. Wish that he was with us tonight. This would mean a great, great deal to Clarence.

An honorable mention and shout-out to Ernie “Boom” Carter. The drummer who played on one song only: “Born to Run.” He picked a good one. So here’s to you, Ernie. Thank you, thank you.

Thanks, of course, Max Weinberg and Roy Bittan, who answered an ad in the Village Voice. And they beat out 60 other drummers and keyboardists for the job. It was the indefatigable, almost dangerously dedicated Mighty Max Weinberg and the fabulous five finger of Professor Roy Bittan. They refined and they defined the sounds of the E Street Band that remains our calling card around the world to this day. Thank you, Roy. Thank you, Max. They are my professional hitmen. I love them both.

Then, 10 years later, Nils Lofgren and Patti Scialfa joined just in time to assist us in the rebirth of Born in the U.S.A. Nils, one of the world’s great, great rock guitarists, with a choir boy’s voice, has given me everything he’s had for the past 30 years. Thank you, Nils. So much love.

And Patti Scialfa — a Jersey Girl — who came down one weekend from New York City and sat in with a local band, Cats on a Smooth Surface and Bobby Bandiera at the Stone Pony, where she sang a killer version of the Exciters’ “Tell ‘Em.” She had a voice that was full of a little Ronnie Spector, a little Dusty Springfield and a lot of something that was her very, very own. After she was done, I walked up, I introduced myself at the back bar, we grabbed a couple of stools and we sat there for the next hour or thirty years or so — talking about music and everything else. So we added my lovely red-headed woman and she broke the boy’s club!

Now, I wanted our band to mirror our audience, and by 1984, that band had grown men and grown women. But, her entrance freaked us out so much that opening night of the Born in the U.S.A. tour, I asked her to come into my dressing room and see what she was gonna wear! So she had on kind of a slightly feminine T-shirt and I stood there, sort of sweating. At my feet, I had a little Samsonite luggage bag that I carried with me, and I kicked it over. It was full of all my smelly, sweaty T-shirts and I said, “Just pick one of these, it’ll be fine.” She’s not wearing one tonight. But Patti, I love you, thank you for your beautiful voice, you changed my band and my life. Thank you for our beautiful children.

So, real bands — real bands are made primarily from the neighborhood. From a real time and real place that exists for a little while, then changes and is gone forever. They’re made from the same circumstances, the same needs, the same hungers, culture. They’re forged in the search of something more promising than what you were born into. These are the elements, the tools, and these are the people who built the place called E Street.

Now, E Street was a dance; was an idea; was a wish; was a refuge; was a home; was a destination; was a gutter dream; and finally, it was a band. We struggled together, and sometimes, we struggled with one another. We bathed in the glory, and often, the heartbreaking confusion of our rewards together. We’ve enjoyed health, and we’ve suffered illness and aging and death together. We took care of one another when trouble knocked, and we hurt one another in big and small ways.

But in the end, we kept faith in each other. And one thing is for certain: As I said before in reference to Clarence Clemons — I told a story with the E Street Band that was, and is, bigger than I ever could have told on my own. And I believe that settles that question.

But that is the hallmark of a rock and roll band — the narrative you tell together is bigger than anyone could have told on your own. That’s the Rolling Stones; the Sex Pistols; that’s Bob Marley and the Wailers. That’s James Brown and His Famous Flames. That’s Neil Young and Crazy Horse.

So, I thank you my beautiful men and women of E Street. You made me dream and love bigger than I could have ever without you. And tonight I stand here with just one regret: that Danny and Clarence couldn’t be with us here tonight.

Sixteen years ago, a few days before my own induction, I stood in my darkened kitchen along with Steve Van Zandt. Steve was just returning to the band after a 15-year hiatus and he was petitioning me to push the Hall of Fame to induct all of us together. I listened, and the Hall of Fame had its rules, and I was proud of my independence. We hadn’t played together in 10 years, we were somewhat estranged, we were just taking the first small steps over reforming. We didn’t know what the future would bring. And perhaps the shadows of some of the old grudges held some sway.

It was a conundrum, as we’ve never quite been fish nor fowl. And Steve was quiet, but persistent. And at the end of our conversation, he just said, “Yeah, I understand. But Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band — that’s the legend.”

So I’m proud to induct, into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, the heart-stopping, pants-dropping, hard-rocking, booty-shaking, love-making, earth-quaking, Viagra-taking, justifying, death-defying, legendary E Street Band.

The Band also performed some songs on the night, these can be seen below

The E Street Shuffle



Video: YouTube

The River



Video: YouTube

Kitty’s Back



Video: YouTube



Video: YouTube

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Music

Christmas Songs, Bruce Springsteen

Bruce Springsteen is a favourite of mine and his version of Santa Claus is coming to town exemplifies his wonderful spirit.

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Bruce Springsteen Santa Claus is coming to town

Bruce Springsteen is an eternal favourite of mine and I may be biased but I think his version of Santa Claus is coming to town is about as good as it gets.

I also love Bruce’s version of Merry Christmas Baby. If like me, you also enjoy Bruce Springsteen’s work, then sit back and enjoy these 2 Christmas favourites.

Merry Christmas Baby



Video: Youtube

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Moonlight Shadow: Mike Oldfield with Maggie Reilly

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Moonlight Shadow

Moonlight Shadow by Mike Oldfield has always been a favourite song of mine, Scottish vocalist Maggie Reilly has such a smooth, yet haunting sound. It’s not a Cold Chisel or Bruce Springsteen as per my usual favourites, but an amazing sound and something that always gets me, every time I hear it, OK What I’m trying to say is, I don’t care what kind of music it is, if I like the sound i’ll like the song.

The Song: Moonlight Shadow was Written and Performed by the incredibly talented Instrumentalist Mike Oldfield, his mix of progressive rock, blended with classical, electronic, new age ambient sounds created a sound all his own, In addition the main vocals for the song were performed by Scottish vocalist Maggie Reilly. The song is the most successful single for Oldfield, reaching number one in a number of countries throughout Europe.

Moonlight Shadow

See Excerpt below from Wikipedia

It has been suggested that the lyrics of the song are a reference to the murder of John Lennon despite the fact that the events in the song do not correspond with those of Lennon’s murder.[7][8] Lennon was shot four times just before 11pm, whereas in the song the time is 4am and the number of shots is six. When asked if “Moonlight Shadow” is a reference to John Lennon’s murder in a 1995 interview, Oldfield responded:

Not really… well, perhaps, when I look back on it, maybe it was. I actually arrived in New York that awful evening when he was shot and I was staying at the Virgin Records house in Perry Street, which was just a few blocks [sic] down the road from the Dakota Building where it happened, so it probably sank into my subconscious. It was originally inspired by a film I loved – Houdini, starring Tony Curtis, which was about attempts to contact Houdini after he’d died, through spiritualism… it was originally a song influenced by that, but a lot of other things must have crept in there without me realizing it.

—?Mike Oldfield, Randall, Gareth (1 June 1995). “Gareth Randall Interviews Mike Oldfield”. Retrieved 1 May 2014.

Moonlight Shadow Lyrics

The first time ever she saw him
Carried away by a moonlight shadow
He passed on worried and warning
Carried away by a moonlight shadow
Lost in a riddle that Saturday night
Far away on the other side
He was caught in the middle of a desperate fight
And she couldn’t find how to push through

The trees that whisper in the evening
Carried away by a moonlight shadow
Sing a song of sorrow and grieving
Carried away by a moonlight shadow
All she saw was a silhouette of a gun
Far away on the other side
He was shot six times by a man on the run
And she couldn’t find how to push through

I stay, I pray
See you in heaven far away
I stay, I pray
See you in heaven one day

Four a.m. in the morning
Carried away by a moonlight shadow
I watched your vision forming
Carried away by a moonlight shadow
Stars roll slowly in a silvery night
Far away on the other side
Will you come to terms with me this night
But she couldn’t find how to push through

I stay, I pray
See you in heaven far away
I stay, I pray
See you in heaven one day

Far away on the other side
Caught in the middle of a hundred and five
The night was heavy and the air was alive
But she couldn’t find how to push through
Carried away by a moonlight shadow
Carried away by a moonlight shadow
Far away on the other side
But she couldn’t find how to push through

Written by Michael Gordon Oldfield • Copyright © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Warner/Chappell Music, Inc, BMG Rights Management US, LLC

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Queen @ Wembly amazing performance by Freddie Mercury

Something happened that day, something frontman Freddie Mercury is given much credit for by guitarist Brian May: Queen – rounded out by John Deacon and Roger Taylor – experienced a stunning rebirth, redrawing their legacy in a 20-minute eruption of passion and bravado before an enraptured London audience.

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Queen at Wembly

Live Aid @ Wembly 7th of July 1985, The performance that day by Queen is regarded by many as the Best Live Musical Performance of all time, Led by front man Freddie Mercury, they managed to “steal the show” with 21 minutes of pure passion and bravado.

Excerpt from Wikipedia:

Something happened that day, something frontman Freddie Mercury is given much credit for by guitarist Brian May: Queen – rounded out by John Deacon and Roger Taylor – experienced a stunning rebirth, redrawing their legacy in a 20-minute eruption of passion and bravado before an enraptured London audience.
“That was entirely down to Freddie,” May marveled years later. “The rest of us played okay, but Freddie was out there and took it to another level.”

The fast-moving afternoon performance covered the breadth of the band’s catalog, cramming a whole concert’s worth of highlights, old and new, into an abbreviated set that included “Bohemian Rhapsody,” “Radio Ga Ga,” “Hammer to Fall” (Queen’s newest single), “Crazy Little Thing Called Love” and the finale of “We Will Rock You” and “We Are the Champions.” “It was,” May added, “the greatest day of our lives.”

Mercury was everywhere: at the piano for the beginning of “Bohemian Rhapsody,” marching around with his sawed-off mic stand during “Radio Ga Ga” as the Wembley crowd clapped in unison, singing with a reserve of emotion, owning the fans and the moment. It was a turn as virtuosic as it was surprising. Where others might have shied away or even made smaller by the moment, Queen rose to the occasion.

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